Fibromyalgia

Epidemiology of Fibromyalgia Syndrome (FMS) (per Johns Hopkins Medical FMS department)

What is fibromyalgia?

Fibromyalgia is a chronic, widespread pain in muscles and soft tissues surrounding the joints throughout the body. The disease is fairly common, affecting approximately 2 to 4 percent of the U.S. population, mostly middle-aged women.
Although its symptoms are similar to other joint diseases, such as arthritis, fibromyalgia is actually a form of soft tissue or muscular rheumatism that causes pain in the muscles and soft tissues.

What causes or triggers fibromyalgia?

Although the cause of fibromyalgia is unknown, researchers believe there may be a link with sleep disturbance, psychological stress, or immune, endocrine, or biochemical abnormalities. Fibromyalgia mainly affects the muscles and the points at which the muscles attach to the bone (at the ligaments and tendons).

What are the symptoms of fibromyalgia?

Pain is the most common and chronic symptom of fibromyalgia. Pain.  The pain ranges from mild to severe and may be described as burning, soreness, stiffness, aching, or gnawing pain. Fibromyalgia usually is associated with characteristic tender spots of pain in the muscles. The following are other common symptoms of fibromyalgia. However each individual may experience symptoms differently. Symptoms may include:

  • Moderate to severe fatigue
  • Decreased exercise endurance
  • Sleep problems at night
  • Depressed mood
  • Anxiety
  • Headaches
  • Irritable bowel symptoms, such as abdominal pain and bloating, diarrhea, and constipation
  • Restless legs
  • Painful menstrual periods
  • The symptoms of fibromyalgia may resemble other medical conditions or problems. Always consult your doctor for a diagnosis.
    So how does this effect your training?
     

    Written by: Anonymous

    If you read the RA write one can see there are few significant similarities between RA and this disease and sometimes accompanies RA. Your training is again greatly affected. The symptoms alone shows that. In my case, I had a few of the symptoms shown above. While RA is much more debilitating than FMS, as stated above FMS usually accompanies RA and that combination is pretty bad.
    Bottom line is know your ailment and workout when you when the window is open of good feeling is open. There are other focused workouts you can do while you are having a FMS attack.


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